Questions about THE FUSE:

The announcement of my drawing STUMPTOWN has prompted many folks to ask about the future of THE FUSE and I just want to be clear that I’m still hard at work on THE FUSE and have no intentions on leaving!

We planned schedules for both these books around each other from the outset last year, and I’ve been working on both for many months already. It is definitely a challenge and requires a bit of extra patience/assistance from my partners in crime (which I appreciate very much :) but so far it’s worked out well and everything is on track.

Thanks for the interest, and I hope that if you enjoy one that you’ll check out the other. I’ve been having an absolute blast working on both projects and am very grateful to both my collaboratoring teams and the fans for the support.

- Justin

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antonyjohnston
antonyjohnston:

If you’ve ever wanted to get into WASTELAND, the book Chris Mitten and I created together before UMBRAL, this is by far the cheapest way I’ve ever seen:
Comixology are having a massive sale, $0.99 per issue or the first 50 issues for $24.99. That’s 50 cents per issue, insanely cheap.

What a killer deal! If you’ve been waiting to check this book out, there’s never been a better time.

antonyjohnston:

If you’ve ever wanted to get into WASTELAND, the book Chris Mitten and I created together before UMBRAL, this is by far the cheapest way I’ve ever seen:

Comixology are having a massive sale, $0.99 per issue or the first 50 issues for $24.99. That’s 50 cents per issue, insanely cheap.

What a killer deal! If you’ve been waiting to check this book out, there’s never been a better time.

ruckawriter
ruckawriter:

Stumptown, “The Case of the King of Clubs,” part 2.
Publisher: ONI PRESS INC. (W) Greg Rucka (A/CA) Justin Greenwood
After discovering her dear friend Mercury beaten to within an inch of his life, Dex is determined to find the culprit at any cost. But when her path again crosses with Seattle-based investigator C.K. Banes, will Dex have an ally or yet another obstacle? Greg Rucka’s fan-favorite detective is back in the second issue of her new ongoing series with artist Justin Greenwood (Image Comics’ THE FUSE)!
Pre-order! Here’s the Diamond solicit info. Or, better yet, you can go to your LCS and tell them you’d like to pre-order the issue!
Diamond Catalogue code: AUG141577

Glad to see this issue in solicitation! I think in some ways this cover defines this arc for me visually. It was one of the earliest images that ruckawriter, James from onipress and I kicked around from the start.
And don’t forget, STUMPTOWN V3 #1 is still available for pre-order as well (JUL141335). You can check out an exclusive preview that went up on cbr today: http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=preview&id=22651

ruckawriter:

Stumptown, “The Case of the King of Clubs,” part 2.

Publisher: ONI PRESS INC. (W) Greg Rucka (A/CA) Justin Greenwood

After discovering her dear friend Mercury beaten to within an inch of his life, Dex is determined to find the culprit at any cost. But when her path again crosses with Seattle-based investigator C.K. Banes, will Dex have an ally or yet another obstacle? Greg Rucka’s fan-favorite detective is back in the second issue of her new ongoing series with artist Justin Greenwood (Image Comics’ THE FUSE)!

Pre-order! Here’s the Diamond solicit info. Or, better yet, you can go to your LCS and tell them you’d like to pre-order the issue!

Diamond Catalogue code: AUG141577

Glad to see this issue in solicitation! I think in some ways this cover defines this arc for me visually. It was one of the earliest images that ruckawriter, James from onipress and I kicked around from the start.

And don’t forget, STUMPTOWN V3 #1 is still available for pre-order as well (JUL141335). You can check out an exclusive preview that went up on cbr today: http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=preview&id=22651

ruckawriter

oshimoi asked:

I enjoyed your post on your love of football. Do you have any plans to write a sport novel, or even better, a comics series? American comics need more of this genre!

ruckawriter answered:

Thank you, that’s very kind.

The new Stumptown arc, being drawn by justingreenwood, is about football to a certain extent, as well as the supporter culture surrounding certain teams in the MLS, and the Cascadia rivalry.

You can find out some more about it here, and you can even pre-order it from your LCS (hint hint hint hint…).

Woot Wooooot!

Orignal art for THE FUSE #5 is now available for sale!

The interior art and cover for issue #5 has been uploaded to ComicConArt's site and you can check out all the pages there (although it's an issue with big spoilers so read your copy first before checking it out :)

You can check out the art here: http://www.comiconart.com/artist/Justin-Greenwood

Some of my favorite pages from early in issue #5:

antonyjohnston
antonyjohnston:

SIGNAL BOOST: The Power of Comic Retailers in a Single Graph
Interesting analysis dept:
We purchased some ads and sponsorships to promote UMBRAL Book One. Everything — clickthroughs, sponsor reads, the lot — points to theumbral.com, the official site, so we could track it.
I’m pretty happy with how it worked out. It’s impossible to say if it actually affected sales, of course. Advertising is a nebulous beast at the best of times. But from the clicks we got, it appears to have definitely helped spread awareness, which can only be a good thing.
But here’s what’s interesting. As you can see from the graphic, our hits were rolling along at a fairly steady pace. Every so often we’d peak or trough a little, but it was pretty steady…
…Until Page 45 made us their Book of the Month. (Page 45 is a prominent store in England.) That’s what the huge spike at the end is, there. And I checked; that spike is almost entirely direct/organic, not referrals from ads or sponsor pages.
THIS IS THE POWER COMIC RETAILERS HAVE. It’s hard to think of another entertainment industry, outside perhaps music in the ’70s with the traditional old record store, where an audience places so much faith in retailers and their recommendations.
Retailers know this, and good retailers use it to promote books that their clientele might otherwise miss. 
Everyone knows there’s a new BATMAN book this month, a new issue of SPIDER-MAN next week, etc. But SHELTERED, or DEAD BODY ROAD, or SOVEREIGN, or UNDERTOW? Not many people know those books even exist, let alone their publishing schedule. And their best chance to find out is if their retailer informs them.
This is why comic creators ask you to pre-order; to tell your retailers you’re interested in a book; and why we focus so much of our own attention on reaching out to retailers, rather than readers themselves. Because the biggest problem almost all comics face is not piracy, or demographics, or any of that nonsense; it’s obscurity. 
And that begins right on the retailer’s shelf. If a book isn’t there in the store, most customers won’t even know it could be, much less try to find it elsewhere. 
The problem for retailers, in turn, is the sheer number of books released every month. It’s hard enough for a large retailer to keep up with everything published, let alone for the hundreds of small, independent stores that make up most of the direct market.
What’s the solution? Well, if everyone except me and my friends stopped making comics, that would be nice ;) But honestly, I have no idea. All I can do, as a creator, is keep on making the best books I can, and try to make sure as many people as possible know about them. 
Beyond that, it’s in the hands of retailers and readers… but mostly retailers.

antonyjohnston:

SIGNAL BOOST: The Power of Comic Retailers in a Single Graph

Interesting analysis dept:

We purchased some ads and sponsorships to promote UMBRAL Book One. Everything — clickthroughs, sponsor reads, the lot — points to theumbral.com, the official site, so we could track it.

I’m pretty happy with how it worked out. It’s impossible to say if it actually affected sales, of course. Advertising is a nebulous beast at the best of times. But from the clicks we got, it appears to have definitely helped spread awareness, which can only be a good thing.

But here’s what’s interesting. As you can see from the graphic, our hits were rolling along at a fairly steady pace. Every so often we’d peak or trough a little, but it was pretty steady…

…Until Page 45 made us their Book of the Month. (Page 45 is a prominent store in England.) That’s what the huge spike at the end is, there. And I checked; that spike is almost entirely direct/organic, not referrals from ads or sponsor pages.

THIS IS THE POWER COMIC RETAILERS HAVE. It’s hard to think of another entertainment industry, outside perhaps music in the ’70s with the traditional old record store, where an audience places so much faith in retailers and their recommendations.

Retailers know this, and good retailers use it to promote books that their clientele might otherwise miss.

Everyone knows there’s a new BATMAN book this month, a new issue of SPIDER-MAN next week, etc. But SHELTERED, or DEAD BODY ROAD, or SOVEREIGN, or UNDERTOW? Not many people know those books even exist, let alone their publishing schedule. And their best chance to find out is if their retailer informs them.

This is why comic creators ask you to pre-order; to tell your retailers you’re interested in a book; and why we focus so much of our own attention on reaching out to retailers, rather than readers themselves. Because the biggest problem almost all comics face is not piracy, or demographics, or any of that nonsense; it’s obscurity

And that begins right on the retailer’s shelf. If a book isn’t there in the store, most customers won’t even know it could be, much less try to find it elsewhere.

The problem for retailers, in turn, is the sheer number of books released every month. It’s hard enough for a large retailer to keep up with everything published, let alone for the hundreds of small, independent stores that make up most of the direct market.

What’s the solution? Well, if everyone except me and my friends stopped making comics, that would be nice ;) But honestly, I have no idea. All I can do, as a creator, is keep on making the best books I can, and try to make sure as many people as possible know about them.

Beyond that, it’s in the hands of retailers and readers… but mostly retailers.